Randomly selected articles from this year's issue

I Write For My Rights

Mohammed Subhabi, Queens College Student


I write because many in history have written for various reasons. But whatever they may be: I write for my rights. Sometimes we write because we want to write and don’t know why. It all starts with a pen and paper, and most importantly the mind. The mind renders its thoughts on the paper. For me my rights are important, and everyone should know their rights living in America. In college we have to know our rights. I even believe there are rights for writers, copyright, and one shouldn’t allow others
to obtain and dismantle another person’s ownership. It is imperative as writers that we write 
and don’t stop because someone criticizes our work. As writers we have rights, but we should not be immune 
to respectful criticism that doesn’t allow the other person 
to speak in vulgar language against our work. As a writer I feel I write for my ...

Common Core Standards

Kathryn O’Donoghue, Queens College Faculty, Doctoral Candidate in English


“Nothing’s wrong,” the school social worker says, which is the first lie. She wants to talk to me about my oldest daughter. Desi reverses her letters, transposes words, neglects punctuation, writes sentences that, with their randomized use of capitals, look like ransom notes. “Her teacher is concerned about her,” the 
social worker continues, which is the second lie. Next year Desi will take the third grade standardized tests in English and Math, along with every other public school student in the country. Her school won a prestigious national award this year and ranks in the top-ten of city elementary schools. Since the citywide school rating system subtracts points for lack of improvement, the new principal is eager to distinguish himself by raising the 
exacting standards of his predecessor. 
Moreover, teacher evaluation now rests upon the test scores of students. The ...

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