Randomly selected articles from this year's issue

Writing in Real-time

QC Voices Bloggers Mike Fu, Christina Torossian, and Rachel Wessel, Queens College Students


Editor’s Note: The assignment was simple: at 8pm on a Wednesday night, three QC Voices bloggers were to log into a Google document. At the top of the document was a question: “What does it mean to ‘Write with Friends’?” For the next hour, the bloggers were to take turns composing sentences in the hopes of building towards an answer to the prompt. Nobody knew what would emerge. Here is what happened. Writing with friends implies the communal, the ritualistic. To write with friends is to share ideas and explore different concepts. Just as interactions among friends involve intrapersonal communication, writing with friends involves the sharing of ideas between peers to improve our writing. Writing is more often than not a private act, an individual meditation. However, when writing with different people, you are no longer just expressing your own ideas, but ...

Off The Margins

Ted Konrath Queens College Student


I am a book lover: I’m not simply an avid reader or a chaser of information, but I also immensely enjoy the physical nature of books. In the modern age we live in, books seem quaint. In a world where any fact can be conveniently found and any image, video, or sound downloaded, a book is considered to be old-fashioned. It’s a low-tech version of information management that’s existed for centuries and failed to keep up with modernity. But I still love books. They are neatly 
ordered ideas, with chapters and pages. Most are compact and 
portable without the need for adapters or batteries. They’re also amazingly hard to destroy. Get a book wet and when it dries out it’s ready to be read again; that’s not so with most electronic devices. And you can drop them without harm, too. Some ...

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