Randomly selected articles from this year's issue

Common Core Standards

Kathryn O’Donoghue, Queens College Faculty, Doctoral Candidate in English


“Nothing’s wrong,” the school social worker says, which is the first lie. She wants to talk to me about my oldest daughter. Desi reverses her letters, transposes words, neglects punctuation, writes sentences that, with their randomized use of capitals, look like ransom notes. “Her teacher is concerned about her,” the 
social worker continues, which is the second lie. Next year Desi will take the third grade standardized tests in English and Math, along with every other public school student in the country. Her school won a prestigious national award this year and ranks in the top-ten of city elementary schools. Since the citywide school rating system subtracts points for lack of improvement, the new principal is eager to distinguish himself by raising the 
exacting standards of his predecessor. 
Moreover, teacher evaluation now rests upon the test scores of students. The ...

Off The Margins

Ted Konrath Queens College Student


I am a book lover: I’m not simply an avid reader or a chaser of information, but I also immensely enjoy the physical nature of books. In the modern age we live in, books seem quaint. In a world where any fact can be conveniently found and any image, video, or sound downloaded, a book is considered to be old-fashioned. It’s a low-tech version of information management that’s existed for centuries and failed to keep up with modernity. But I still love books. They are neatly 
ordered ideas, with chapters and pages. Most are compact and 
portable without the need for adapters or batteries. They’re also amazingly hard to destroy. Get a book wet and when it dries out it’s ready to be read again; that’s not so with most electronic devices. And you can drop them without harm, too. Some ...

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