Randomly selected articles from this year's issue

We Know

Saygun Gökarıksel, Writing Fellow, Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology


“When will they stop writing such letters,” thought the public administration officer. He had been working in the department responsible for answering the citizen’s complaints for more than a decade. Reading about other people’s problems, complaints, and life stories was a learning experience for him. When the letter was sufficiently attractive, he would then dream about what the author might look like. He spied on many strange faces, eavesdropped on many secret conversations, and recorded many previously unfamiliar stories to his diary as “words from friends.” He befriended those words that reminded him of the society he lived in even during his most solitary hours spent at his desk in the office. But how about this newly arrived letter? “Today everyone seems to be in ridiculously inflated debt with no prospects of repayment,” he thought. What was there to say ...

Off The Margins

Ted Konrath Queens College Student


I am a book lover: I’m not simply an avid reader or a chaser of information, but I also immensely enjoy the physical nature of books. In the modern age we live in, books seem quaint. In a world where any fact can be conveniently found and any image, video, or sound downloaded, a book is considered to be old-fashioned. It’s a low-tech version of information management that’s existed for centuries and failed to keep up with modernity. But I still love books. They are neatly 
ordered ideas, with chapters and pages. Most are compact and 
portable without the need for adapters or batteries. They’re also amazingly hard to destroy. Get a book wet and when it dries out it’s ready to be read again; that’s not so with most electronic devices. And you can drop them without harm, too. Some ...

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